This week is Men’s Health Week

Sam Sowemimo Disability, Getting you back to work, Jobs, Military, Statistics

It is a good opportunity to stop and think of how we can give our support to those who suffer from mental health conditions. Statistics on men with mental health show the impact of this condition in the British society:

  • 73% of adults who ‘go missing’ are men (Reference: University of York).
  • 87% of rough sleepers are men (Reference: Crisis).
  • Men are nearly three times more likely than women to become alcohol dependent (8.7% of men are alcohol dependent compared to 3.3% of women) (Reference: HSCIC).
  • Men are three times as likely to report frequent drug use than women (4.2% and 1.4% respectively) and more than two thirds of drug-related deaths occur in men (Reference: Information Centre).
  • Men make up 95% of the prison population (Reference: House of Commons Library). 72% of male prisoners suffer from two or more mental disorders (Reference: Social Exclusion Unit).
  • Boys are around three times more likely to receive a permanent or fixed period exclusion than girls (Reference: uk).
  • Men have measurably lower access to the social support of friends, relatives and community (References:  Borehamand D. Pevalin).
  • Men commit 86% of violent crime (and are twice as likely to be victims of violent crime) (Reference: ONS).
  • Over three quarters of people who kill themselves are men (Reference: ONS). 
  • 38% would be concerned that their employer would think badly of them if they took time off work for a mental health concern – compared to 26% for a physical injury. (Amongst men with mental health concerns, 52% are concerned.) (Reference: Opinion Leader for the Men’s Health Forum/2016)

How can we help?

You don’t need any special training to show someone you care about them. Often just being there for someone and doing small things can be really valuable. For example:

  • Simply giving someone space to talk, and listening to how they’re feeling, can be really helpful in itself. If they’re finding it difficult, let them know that you’re there when they are ready.
  • Offer reassurance. Seeking help can feel lonely, and sometimes scary. You can reassure someone by letting them know that they are not alone, and that you will be there to help.
  • Stay calm. Even though it might be upsetting to hear that someone you care about is distressed, try to stay calm. This will help your friend or family member feel calmer too, and show them that they can talk to you openly without upsetting you.
  • Be patient. You might want to know more details about their thoughts and feelings, or want them to get help immediately. But it’s important to let them set the pace for seeking support themselves.
  • Try not to make assumptions. Your perspective might be useful to your friend or family member, but try not to assume that you already know what may have caused their feelings, or what will help.
  • Keep social contact. Part of the emotional support you offer could be to keep things as normal as possible. This could include involving your friend or family member in social events, or chatting about other parts of your lives

 

(Source: Mind – http://bit.ly/2Jw8JtB)

The Poppy Factory:

The Poppy Factory is the country’s leading employment charity for veterans with health conditions or impairments. We work with businesses across the country to provide bespoke opportunities and ongoing employment support for hundreds of veterans with disabilities of all ages and from all Services, helping to restore their financial independence through sustainable and rewarding work.

We are here to give you our support. If you need help, please contact us today!

This week is Men’s Health Week

13 Jun 2018

It is a good opportunity to stop and think of how we can give our support to those who suffer from mental health conditions. Statistics on men with mental health show the impact of this condition in the British society:

  • 73% of adults who ‘go missing’ are men (Reference: University of York).
  • 87% of rough sleepers are men (Reference: Crisis).
  • Men are nearly three times more likely than women to become alcohol dependent (8.7% of men are alcohol dependent compared to 3.3% of women) (Reference: HSCIC).
  • Men are three times as likely to report frequent drug use than women (4.2% and 1.4% respectively) and more than two thirds of drug-related deaths occur in men (Reference: Information Centre).
  • Men make up 95% of the prison population (Reference: House of Commons Library). 72% of male prisoners suffer from two or more mental disorders (Reference: Social Exclusion Unit).
  • Boys are around three times more likely to receive a permanent or fixed period exclusion than girls (Reference: uk).
  • Men have measurably lower access to the social support of friends, relatives and community (References:  Borehamand D. Pevalin).
  • Men commit 86% of violent crime (and are twice as likely to be victims of violent crime) (Reference: ONS).
  • Over three quarters of people who kill themselves are men (Reference: ONS). 
  • 38% would be concerned that their employer would think badly of them if they took time off work for a mental health concern – compared to 26% for a physical injury. (Amongst men with mental health concerns, 52% are concerned.) (Reference: Opinion Leader for the Men’s Health Forum/2016)

How can we help?

You don't need any special training to show someone you care about them. Often just being there for someone and doing small things can be really valuable. For example:

  • Simply giving someone space to talk, and listening to how they’re feeling, can be really helpful in itself. If they're finding it difficult, let them know that you're there when they are ready.
  • Offer reassurance. Seeking help can feel lonely, and sometimes scary. You can reassure someone by letting them know that they are not alone, and that you will be there to help.
  • Stay calm. Even though it might be upsetting to hear that someone you care about is distressed, try to stay calm. This will help your friend or family member feel calmer too, and show them that they can talk to you openly without upsetting you.
  • Be patient. You might want to know more details about their thoughts and feelings, or want them to get help immediately. But it’s important to let them set the pace for seeking support themselves.
  • Try not to make assumptions. Your perspective might be useful to your friend or family member, but try not to assume that you already know what may have caused their feelings, or what will help.
  • Keep social contact. Part of the emotional support you offer could be to keep things as normal as possible. This could include involving your friend or family member in social events, or chatting about other parts of your lives

 

(Source: Mind - http://bit.ly/2Jw8JtB)

The Poppy Factory:

The Poppy Factory is the country’s leading employment charity for veterans with health conditions or impairments. We work with businesses across the country to provide bespoke opportunities and ongoing employment support for hundreds of veterans with disabilities of all ages and from all Services, helping to restore their financial independence through sustainable and rewarding work.

We are here to give you our support. If you need help, please contact us today!

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If you are a veteran with health conditions we can help you find work

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  • Read the @NHSuk five tips for staying healthy this winter. We know that some of the veterans we help find the winte… https://t.co/jdXUSByu2h
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